Quick-Start Solutions: Simple Rescue Strategy for Rooms That Are Buried in Paperwork

Sick and tired of unorganized…*things*? Feeling overwhelmed at the thought of getting tackling that nondescript pile of stuff? I’m here to help. This exercise will help you move one non-painful, very manageable, highly productive step toward getting organized.

Problem: Help! My living room/dining room/bedroom/office/kitchen/the doghouse is overflowing with papers that are of questionable importance!

Solution: Go grab some empty file folders. If you don’t have any lying around the house, run to your nearest office supply store/drug store/grocery store…or scroll to the bottom to see some cool folders Amazon can have on your doorstep within 1 to 2 days…depending on your shipping preferences [note: affiliate links included].

If you don’t have folders right this second, you can still separate the papers into piles, but label the piles CAREFULLY, and clip the papers in each pile together using a paperclip or binder clip. Now. We’re ready to begin:

1. SET A GOAL, and determine how much paperwork you would like to clean up in your current session. Be realistic. If you know you only have the energy to work on the task for 30 minutes, set a timer for 30 minutes. If you can work for a full hour…POWER HOURRR! Let’s Go!

2. Create categories,  and label each folder according to the types of papers you have. If you can’t think of categories, try starting with these: Health, Home, Work, Finance, Bills, Leisure. Some of you may need to add a category for School. If you have kids, each child should have his or her own folder…but for starters, you can keep them all in one folder. For now. You WILL have to go back and separate everything out, though. So it’s best to just make a folder for each child if you have a massive amount of paperwork coming in from school, hobbies, etc.

3. Pick up one piece of paper. Determine which category the paper best fits. Example, if you pick up a car insurance bill, file it in the “bills” folder. If you can’t decide within 30 second, set the paper aside, and revisit it at the end. 

4. Repeat process until you can see the table/desk/floor/interior of the oven (yes, I’ve seen this before) or wherever your unruly papers have been landing. Advanced tip: (file your papers in chronological order as you add them to the folders; doing this now will save time when you need to access these papers later…and you WILL need to access your papers later: either to use them, to file them more permanently, OR to throw them away).
5. When finished, store the folders in a standing file box or file cabinet so you can access them later.
***If you still have remaining papers to clean up, don’t worry. Pull out your calendar, and schedule another time WITHIN THE NEXT 7 DAYS to continue the task. Write it down as an “appointment!” Keep repeating these “appointments” until all papers have been cleaned up and appropriately filed.
Maintenance: Set aside a general basket, bin, or letter tray to collect paperwork throughout the week. Choose one designated day each week to clear out the basket and file paperwork in its rightful folder. Eventually, the papers should go into a permanent file cabinet or drawer. But I will discuss that in a future post in the interest of keeping it simple and just focusing on quick cleanup strategies for now.
Recommended Supplies:

 

 

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One Less Excuse to Skip Healthy Foods (Product Recommendation)

The slotted salad slicer bowl is the perfect vegetable slicer for making salads, stir-fry, and other healthy recipes.

I’ve been putting forth an effort to cut carbs. Naturally, I’m always on the lookout for new organizing and time-saving products. In light of my determination to eat more fresh veggies (and to encourage others to do so as well!), this salad slicer caught my attention.

Slotted Saladd Slicer

You can see it in action here.

The act of creating a vented salad bowl just saved us an extra 15-20-30 minutes chopping produce for our salads! In addition to the time savings, the slotted salad bowl saves us energy! And cuts on our fingers! As long as you’ve got vegetables in the refrigerator and one of these slicer bowls, there is now virtually no excuse to not make fresh salads. Think of all the meal prep possibilities! Don’t get me started…

You can purchase  slotted salad slicer bowl by visiting the product page on my store here. [Surprise! I have  a store…Though it’s only in “soft opening” phase right now. I’ve been wanting to tell you all. But I’m still tweaking the aesthetics. You know how I am. Nevertheless, it’s fully functional, and you can check it out and buy cool products right now. Stay tuned for the grand opening…]

5 Minutes of Morning Mindfulness – 7/19/18

Check out my latest morning motivational video on IGTV. Don’t forget to follow @rlprofessionalorganizer. I post daily!
https://www.instagram.com/tv/BlXZrUUh5cq/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=1xegep79ldjp3

24 Hours Not Enough? Learn to Manage Time Like Money

To be fair, most of us have felt at one time or another as if we simply don’t have enough money. When that happens, we either look for an additional stream of income, or we refine our budget and try to work within it. Time is similar. However, because we can’t simply make more time, the latter approach is the default. What does it mean to learn to manage time as if it’s money?

Viewing Time As a Budget

We’re all working with the same 24 hours. That part of the equation is set. Where everyone begins to differ is the very diverse ways in which we use our 24 hours. Think of your 24 hours as an allowance you receive each day. You literally can do whatever you please with your 24 hours. But for most of us, it’s not that simple, right? We decide we want housing, clothes, food, financial savings, entertainment. All those things cost. They cost money and time [unless you literally have someone handing these things to you…in which case, please come over here and advertise YOUR coaching services]. Anyhow…these things cost what I’ve come to refer to as time dollars. In planning your schedule–because you should be planning your schedule–start with 24 hours, and subtract from that each time you schedule an activity. For example, your 8-hour workday costs 8 time dollars, leaving you with 16 remaining.

But actually…it’s inaccurate to begin by subtracting from 24…unless you count sleep!

Begin By Planning Time to Sleep

Sleep is so important that I always recommend starting schedule planning by setting a bedtime, deciding how long you want to ideally sleep, and scheduling a wake-up time accordingly. We underestimate the importance of sleep. While you may think you need time to go to the library, pick up your dry cleaning, and attend the birthday party you were invited to, your body places a much greater priority on repairing cells and tissues, encoding learned information into your memory, and restoring your energy. These very important activities are just a few that happen while you’re sleeping.

After Designating Sleep Hours

Let’s say you plan to get seven hours of sleep each night. After subtracting seven from your 24-hour time budget, you are left with 17 hours of time that can be allocated to work, fun, leisure, and everything in between. If you ever find yourself feeling tempted to waste time or engage in an activity that does not serve your well-being or contribute to the well-being of others in a manner you can afford, actively remind yourself of the remaining hours in your time budget. Then asks if it is worth allocating time to participate in the activity.

Practice Makes Perfect

If you are a person who struggles with decision-making and prioritizing tasks, you may struggle at first with deciding which activities are deserving of your time. Don’t be discouraged. Simply do your best to make a decision. Evaluate the outcome of that decision. Then carry that analysis with you as you keep moving forward in approaching each day as if you are on a strict time budget. Eventually, you will become better at ranking tasks according to importance, balancing social commitments, and becoming a better decision-maker and steward of your time.

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The Real Reason You’re Always Late

I’ve always viewed tardiness as a touchy subject. If you’re a person who is consistently on time, you may feel like others are late because they don’t value your time. While this may be true in a percentage of cases, I know…from personal experience…that there are multiple layers to a person’s ability to be on time and that oftentimes, tardiness may not be rooted in a basic disregard for others. Instead, people who are chronically late often have legitimate struggles with learning to manage time effectively and are more likely to be prone to over-committing themselves to a variety of tasks and obligations. In addition, inaccurate time perception is oftentimes a culprit that only makes matters worse. Still, there are other cases in which hidden emotional stress or anxiety inhibits an individual’s ability to regularly show up on time.

Trying to Please Everyone

We live in a time of InstaPots, entertainment on demand, and “there’s an app for that!” It’s very easy to find ourselves taking on the societal expectations of “fast,” “easy,” and “always accessible.” Therefore, many of us have lost touch with our ability to say no, to plan things out, and to do things on timelines that are more feasible for us. We feel like we always have to deliver. We find ourselves always wanting to perform. We never want to let anyone down. Therefore, people are increasingly overstretching themselves without even realizing it until there is a logistical, relational, or physical breakdown. And then there’s the guilt. Society steadily streams the message that there is no room for us to attend to our human needs. But the reality is we must. The irony of adopting a mindset of over-committing in the interest of never letting anyone down is that by doing so, your risk of letting yourself and everyone else down rises sharply.

Taking time to plan your schedule is essential. Only after creating a schedule for yourself and deciding when you would like to make yourself available (and are logistically able to do so) can you realistically ensure you are able to fulfill the time commitments you decide to undertake. Moreover, you must say no whenever a request for your time is made and you are unwilling or unable to either a) provide sufficient time to comfortably meet the request or b) re-prioritize your current commitments to make the new request fit. If you are unwilling or unable to do a or b, saying no is within your best interest; doing so also better for the person who is making the request. The sooner that person is made aware that his or her request will not work with your schedule, the earlier he or she can request an alternative time or make other arrangements altogether. Sometimes we waste time and needlessly cram our schedules with things that don’t serve us or other people. In many cases, we can avoid these situations by being more realistic with our time management and planning ahead.

Inaccurate Time Perception

To some of us, a minute isn’t a minute, and an hour isn’t an hour. Those of us who are challenged in the way we perceive time know that this can easily lead to always arriving a little late or even showing up awkwardly early. But there are ways to overcome this type of time management hurdle. Addressing inaccurate time perception requires an initial assessment. I recommend spending a day or, if your schedule changes often, an entire week timing and recording how long it takes to do your normal, recurring tasks. Make a list of how long your commutes take, how much time you usually spend in the shower, how long it takes you to read through your emails at the office, the average length of your phone calls, all the major events that comprise  a  typical day. Next, you HAVE to begin maintaining a written schedule if you do not do so already. Keep your list of timed activities next to your planner or wherever you choose to record your schedule. When planning your schedule, ALWAYS reference the list you’ve created, and budget your time accordingly. That means if you know your friend wants to meet you across town after work and you know it takes you 45 minutes to commute to that area, go ahead and tell that person you will meet them a full hour after your workday ends. Not only are you accounting for the 45-minute drive, but you are allowing yourself an extra 15 minutes to have a quick chat with your supervisor before leaving, go to the restroom, and attend to any other small time “vacuums”  that tend to pop up whenever we really have somewhere to go. While it is important to actually allow yourself the extra time, the game-changing potential lies in continuing to behave as if you only have 45 minutes to get there. This means recreating that same sense of urgency despite knowing you have a time cushion. That part may or may not take a little practice, so be firm, yet patient and consistent with yourself.

Set Firm Time Barriers

Whether you have to set a very loud alarm, have someone call you at a particular cut-off time, or use an app on your phone, creating unavoidable reminders that you need to stop what you’re doing and move on to the next activity will greatly enhance your ability to avoid being late. Be very intentional about how you structure your activities and transition points (i.e. leaving one place to commute to another, stopping one task and beginning the next). Try to make it nearly impossible for you to ignore the reminders and time boundaries you create for yourself. By giving yourself the right tools and holding yourself accountable, you will immediately begin to see real change in the way you manage time and adhere to deadlines. Inviting other people you trust to also keep you accountable will only add fuel to your self-improvement fire.

 

 

 

 

New! Check Out My Daily 5-Minute Morning Mindfulness Videos on Instagram

Click here to view my 5 Minutes of Mindfulness video on IGTV. Or follow me on Instagram at @rlprofessionalorganizer [And help me reach 4,000? Please and thank you :-D]